PATIENT IDENTIFICATION

Are your patients ready for a different treatment choice for their relapsing multiple sclerosis?

For RMS patients like yours, disease activity can mean disability progression1

More frequent relapses, MRI activity, and new or worsening symptoms are all signs of active RMS.1,2

8 out of 10 patients with RMS
reported that their relapse lasted
one week or more.3*

Only 1 in 4 patients with RMS are
started on high efficacy therapies
at diagnosis.4

Nearly 1 in 2 patients with early-stage
RMS starting platform therapy or
dimethyl fumarate experience
treatment failure in the first
year of treatment.5,6‡

*Results from the MS in America Study, an online survey conducted in 2013 and completed by 2562 adult MS patients who were US residents or citizens living abroad.3

Analysis of US Symphony Anonymous Patient Level Data from November 2019-October 2020 pertaining to patients with MS. High efficacy therapies include ocrelizumab, natalizumab, alemtuzumab, fingolimod, siponimod, cladribine, and ozanimod.4

A retrospective analysis of outcomes in newly diagnosed adult patients (N=1661) with ≥1 DMT claims of interferon, glatiramer acetate, or dimethyl fumarate from January 2016-March 2018 who were identified using a large US administrative claims database.5,6

Meet a few of the more than 8,000 patients prescribed
KESIMPTA as a first-line treatment, or after experience with
other DMTs7

Kristin

Mom, real estate agent, RMS patient; initiated Kesimpta in 2020*

I started experiencing relapses on my previous treatment,
and my doctor wanted me to try KESIMPTA.

Kristin was ready for a different choice to manage her disease activity.

Despite being treated with a DMT, Kristin continued to be affected by RMS.

Clinical factors:

  • Experienced recent relapse despite being on an oral first-line treatment

  • Evidence of lesion activity in recent MRI

Non-clinical factors:

  • Continued relapses despite treatment

  • Wants to find a treatment that works for her

  • Wants to reduce relapses in her life

Rachel

Partner, stepmom, medical dosimetrist, RMS patient; initiated KESIMPTA in 2020*

My doctor had found 2 new lesions. Now I take KESIMPTA which helps me manage my RMS.

Rachel loves to travel. She doesn't love dealing with RMS.

After trying 2 DMTs, Rachel was looking for more control over disease activity.

Clinical factors:

  • Previously on Aubagio®

  • 2 new lesions on recent MRI

  • 2 separate neurologists recommended KESIMPTA

Non-clinical factors:

  • Worried about potential side effects

  • Wants less frequent dosing

Walt

Husband, dad, aeronautical engineer, RMS patient; initiated
KESIMPTA in 2021*

I chose KESIMPTA over infusions for my first RMS treatment.
I can administer it myself at home.

Being diagnosed with RMS was overwhelming.

Walt wanted a treatment that could help manage his RMS activity.

Clinical factors:

  • An MRI for severe headache led to recent RMS diagnosis

  • No previous DMT

Non-clinical factors:

  • Dislikes needles, refused infusions

  • Wants to treat at home

  • Feels at ease with Sensoready Pen, despite initial concern about injections

B-cell treatments have become an important tool in treating RMS8†

Annual NBRx share of B-cell therapies

This chart shows the annual NBRx share of B-cell therapy.

B-cell therapies now account for more than
40% of all new prescriptions
in RMS

Based on annual NBRx Share Data from 2018 through November 2021. B-cell therapies include KESIMPTA (7%) and Ocrevus® (ocrelizumab) (35%). KESIMPTA was approved in August 2020.

Have you considered B-cell therapies for your
RMS patients?

Start patients on KESIMPTA today

DOWNLOAD START FORM

Submit a Start Form by fax or online at CoverMyMeds®

VISIT COVERMYMEDS®

DMT=disease-modifying therapy; MOA=mechanism of action; MRI=magnetic resonance imaging; MS=multiple sclerosis; RMS=relapsing MS.

*Actual KESIMPTA patient who was compensated for their time. Individual results may vary.

References: 1. Giovannoni G, Butzkueven H, Dhib-Jalbut S, et al. Brain health: time matters in multiple sclerosis. Mult Scler Relat Disord. 2016;9(Suppl1)S5-S48. 2. Stankiewicz JM, Weiner HL. An argument for broad use of high efficacy treatments in early multiple sclerosis. Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm. 2020;7:e636. doi:10.1212/NXI.0000000000000636 3. MS in America: relapse frequency and duration. Accessed February 22, 2022. https://multiplesclerosis.net/living-with-ms/multiple-sclerosis-relapses 4. Data on file. US Symphony ALPD Q4 2020 Data. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp; East Hanover, NJ. December 2020. 5. Conway D, Hersh C, Wang M, Yang F, Deshpande C. Treatment failure in patients with multiple sclerosis initiating frequently used first line therapies. PO02. Poster presented at: 8th Joint ACTRIMS-ECTRIMS Meeting MS; September 11-13, 2020; Virtual. 6. Data on file. HEOR US unmet needs. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp; East Hanover, NJ. July 2020. 7. Data on file. Q4 2021 results. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp; 2021. 8. Data on file. Ocrevus Px demographics and Rx behavior. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp; East Hanover, NJ. November 2021.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Contraindication: KESIMPTA is contraindicated in patients with active hepatitis B virus infection.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Infections: An increased risk of infections has been observed with other anti-CD20 B-cell depleting therapies. KESIMPTA has the potential for an increased risk of infections

INDICATION

KESIMPTA is indicated for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), to include clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting disease, and active secondary progressive disease, in adults.

SEE IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

INDICATION

KESIMPTA is indicated for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), to include clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting disease, and active secondary progressive disease, in adults.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Contraindication: KESIMPTA is contraindicated in patients with active hepatitis B virus infection.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Infections: An increased risk of infections has been observed with other anti-CD20 B-cell depleting therapies. KESIMPTA has the potential for an increased risk of infections including serious bacterial, fungal, and new or reactivated viral infections; some have been fatal in patients treated with other anti-CD20 antibodies. The overall rate of infections and serious infections in KESIMPTA-treated patients was similar to teriflunomide-treated patients (51.6% vs 52.7%, and 2.5% vs 1.8%, respectively). The most common infections reported by KESIMPTA-treated patients in relapsing MS (RMS) trials included upper respiratory tract infection (39%) and urinary tract infection (10%). Delay KESIMPTA administration in patients with an active infection until resolved.

Consider the potential increased immunosuppressive effects when initiating KESIMPTA after an immunosuppressive therapy or initiating an immunosuppressive therapy after KESIMPTA.

Hepatitis B Virus: Reactivation: No reports of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation in patients with MS treated with KESIMPTA. However, HBV reactivation, in some cases resulting in fulminant hepatitis, hepatic failure, and death, has occurred in patients treated with ofatumumab at higher intravenous doses for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) than the recommended dose in MS and in patients treated with other anti-CD20 antibodies.

Infection: KESIMPTA is contraindicated in patients with active hepatitis B disease. Fatal infections caused by HBV in patients who have not been previously infected have occurred in patients treated with ofatumumab at higher intravenous doses for CLL than the recommended dose in MS. Perform HBV screening in all patients before initiation of KESIMPTA. Patients who are negative for HBsAg and positive for HB core antibody [HBcAb+] or are carriers of HBV [HBsAg+], should consult liver disease experts before starting and during KESIMPTA treatment.

Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy: No cases of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) have been reported for KESIMPTA in RMS clinical studies; however, PML resulting in death has occurred in patients being treated with ofatumumab at higher intravenous doses for CLL than the recommended dose in MS. In addition, JC virus infection resulting in PML has also been observed in patients treated with other anti-CD20 antibodies and other MS therapies. If PML is suspected, withhold KESIMPTA and perform an appropriate diagnostic evaluation. If PML is confirmed, KESIMPTA should be discontinued.

Vaccinations: Administer all immunizations according to immunization guidelines: for live or live-attenuated vaccines at least 4 weeks and, whenever possible at least 2 weeks prior to starting KESIMPTA for inactivated vaccines. The safety of immunization with live or live-attenuated vaccines following KESIMPTA therapy has not been studied. Vaccination with live or live-attenuated vaccines is not recommended during treatment and after discontinuation until B-cell repletion.

Vaccination of Infants Born to Mothers Treated with KESIMPTA During Pregnancy. For infants whose mother was treated with KESIMPTA during pregnancy, assess B-cell counts prior to administration of live or live-attenuated vaccines. If the B-cell count has not recovered in the infant, do not administer the vaccine as having depleted B-cells may pose an increased risk in these infants.

Injection-Related Reactions: Injection-related reactions with systemic symptoms occurred most commonly within 24 hours of the first injection, but were also observed with later injections. There were no life-threatening injection reactions in RMS clinical studies.

The first injection of KESIMPTA should be performed under the guidance of an appropriately trained health care professional. If injection-related reactions occur, symptomatic treatment is recommended.

Reduction in Immunoglobulins: As expected with any B-cell depleting therapy, decreased immunoglobulin levels were observed. Monitor the levels of quantitative serum immunoglobulins during treatment, especially in patients with opportunistic or recurrent infections and after discontinuation of therapy until B-cell repletion. Consider discontinuing KESIMPTA therapy if a patient with low immunoglobulins develops a serious opportunistic infection or recurrent infections, or if prolonged hypogammaglobulinemia requires treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins.

Fetal Risk: Based on animal data, KESIMPTA can cause fetal harm due to B-cell lymphopenia and reduce antibody response in offspring exposed to KESIMPTA in utero. Transient peripheral B-cell depletion and lymphocytopenia have been reported in infants born to mothers exposed to other anti-CD20 B-cell depleting antibodies during pregnancy. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception while receiving KESIMPTA and for at least 6 months after the last dose.

Most common adverse reactions (>10%) are upper respiratory tract infection, headache, injection-related reactions, and local injection-site reactions.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide.

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